WiMUN XI

On Sunday 30 June, delegates from AGGS, representing the states of Poland and the Philippines, made their way over to Withington Girls’ School in order to enjoy a ‘fruitful’ debate at WiMUN XI, the 11th Model UN conference at Withington.

As ambassador for Poland, I obviously had planned for this day months in advance, with well-written and witty acronyms at hand (WARISNOTWARSAWME) and a very bold fashion statement which involved wearing 2 different coloured shoes on each foot. Excited for the day, delegates engaged in (hopefully) friendly table tennis matches before gathering at the opening ceremony before going to their respective committees.

In Security Council, debate was as lively as usual, with the P5 being enemies of the UN as usual. I made an unpopular policy statement to begin with, for describing myself as “buzzin” to attend a “lit” debate, which almost got me evicted before caucus even started. During the course of the debate, we watched in horror as the Economic and Social committee rolled in a giant model of an outdated £1 coin accompanied by an even larger euro symbol – which perhaps was a metaphor for the current state of affairs between the UK and the EU. The Security Council debated my resolution on reforming the Responsibility to Protect, which notably had a clause suggesting the creation of a Security Council group chat to speed up response to atrocity crimes via the communication of emoji. However, Russia (who had been threatening to invade Poland for the whole conference) vetoed it so it didn’t pass. When it came to joke awards, I of course won the most important awards of the conference of “best-dressed” and “best shoes” – turns out my odd choice of footwear was a hit!

WiMUN XI also had a special new committee, called “Historical Council” which imitated Churchill’s War Cabinet with delegates representing people in the cabinet and debating as if it were post-1945, addressing issues such as the Soviet Union and the national healthcare. Our delegate was no longer one representing Poland, but instead represented Richard Casey of Australia, however when asked how the debate was she responded with “dead” – this can be taken both literally and metaphorically. The representative of Richard Casey managed to win “best-looking” and “best shoes” as well as a rather questionable “best couple” with another much-loved delegate.

In Environment, our delegate also had an interesting time by merging with the Netherlands and Ukraine to create “NethPolKraine” relating some rather controversial views on the issues at hand. This year’s conference encouraged everyone to bring reusable bottles to drink from to improve the environment, however the delegate must admit she witnessed a few rogue single-use plastics – no doubt from climate-change deniers such as the USA.

EcoSoc and Political had a fun time in joint committee dancing to Rasputin instead of debating the most captivating and realistic issue of a potential for a shared currency.

In Human Rights, our delegate representing the Philippines made a big impact not only with her fantastic debate, but her newly dip-dyed bright pink hair. Needless to say, she won “best hair”. Our delegates of Poland and Philippines merged with Israel, USA, Turkey and Australia too to create the new country of “PIPUTA”. The delegate notes that merging countries seems to be somewhat of a new trend at conferences. Our delegate of Poland also won “most likely to go to prison” and whilst we want to say that we’re surprised, we’re really not.

After committee and joint committee sessions, we came together for the closing ceremony and the announcements of the real awards. Our school were delighted to receive many awards, as follows:

  • Sanaa K (Philippines, Human Rights) – Highly Commended
  • Lauren F (Philippines, Human Rights Council) – Special Mention
  • Gowri A (Philippines – Special Commission on South-East Asia) – Commended
  • Eva E (Phillippines – Political) – Special Mention
  • Safa A (Poland, Security Council) – Special Mention
  • Ishita A (Poland [Richard Casey], Historical Council) – Special Mention
  • Hedye G (Poland, Human Rights) – Commended
  • Saffiyah K (Poland, Political) – Commended
  • Hania S (Poland, World Health Organisation) – Commended
  • Katie Y (Poland, Environment) – Outstanding
  • Katie Y (Poland, Joint Committee Environment and Youth) – Outstanding

We were incredibly proud of these achievements, especially Katie’s double Outstanding win. However, Katie had to leave early and I had to have the awkward experience of collecting her award and explaining to the whole conference that she had left. WiMUN XI was such a good experience with many awards won, fantastic debate, with all 3 of our first-timers enjoying it and speaking, and we thought we had finished the conference on a good note, but just had to wait for the delegation awards to be announced.

We sat through the awarding for commended and highly commended delegations, itching to take an MUN picture and head home, after the announcement of the overall winners with Outstanding Delegation, so many of us were barely listening until they announced that Poland won!

It was a shock for all of us, as it is the first time in the history of MUN that we have ever won Outstanding Delegation. Delighted, we all came down to collect our award and take a photo. This award was most special because it was our most loved advisor, Miss Mitchell’s, last conference with us. She was the one who started MUN at our school, and we were able to win this award as a thank you for all the help she has given us, and we wish her the best of luck setting up Model UN at her new school to further share the joys of the institution as she has done so here.

Whilst it’s regretful to see her go, we welcome next year full of conferences to enjoy with Mr Humphrys who also attended WIMUN XI with us. Thank you for everything and see you next year for even more ‘fruitful’ debate!

Safa A, 12-7

Citizenship Campaign Makers Final

For the past couple of months, the whole of year 9 have been working on a Campaign Makers project in their Citizenship lessons. This project has led them to learning about social issues in their local area, to finding a charity who are just as passionate about that issue as they are. The whole year group have become active in tackling their chosen issue, raising money for their charity, and many may continue to support the charity in the future.

Groups of a few students chose an issue, and prepared an informative and persuasive presentation about their issue and charity to show to their classes. The best group from each class were voted for by their own peers, and the winning group from each class was put through to the final, which was held on Friday 17th.

There was a very wide range of issues discussed during the final, from sexism in the streets to addiction, from mental health to gang violence.

Each group put forward an explanation of why they were passionate about their social issue, why they had chosen their charity and what they had done to help. They had chosen a variety of creative, and very successful, fundraising methods; there were car boot sales, dog walking, car washes and sponsored walks. All the presentations were incredibly creative and effective, including homemade videos, songs, dances and role plays.

After all 7 groups had presented, the judges reached a decision. The winners of the £500 prize to their chosen charity, generously donated by the PTA, were…

Grace S (9-3), Rosa H (9-4) and Amelie Q (9-2) from 9A! Their chosen charity was The Wellspring, a homelessness charity based in Stockport. They had an eye-opening presentation about the reality of homelessness, an engaging true or false quiz, and an amazingly emotive dance capturing the story of someone who was homeless for a part of their life. They also raised an amazing £200 from a car wash and cake sale for The Wellspring, as well as the £500 prize.

The whole year group really enjoyed becoming active citizens; getting involved with issues they are passionate about near them and raising money and awareness to try and make a difference. Thank you to the three judges: Mrs Ogunmyiwa; Maddie H, the AGGS charity head girl, and Sue, part of the PTA, and thank you to Miss Mitchell for organising everything and making the final run so smoothly.

Read the following post written by one of the Year 9 groups talking about the charity they have chosen to campaign for: The Trussell Trust… Read their post here »

Campaign Makers

Hi AGGS! In year 9 we’re doing a project called Campaign Makers, where my group and I had to choose a social issue that we were especially passionate about and also a charity that promotes the same cause.

We decided that our social issue was going to be homelessness; an issue which is most prevalent in Manchester currently, and as our charity we chose Trussell Trust, as they provide excellent help for people in difficult, unimaginable situations. This charity campaign to make sure that, one day, no one will have to turn for their help. They support a nationwide network of food banks and together they provide emergency food and support to people locked in poverty.

Currently in the UK, more than 14 million people are living in poverty – including 4.5 million children. Imagine that, being a young, vulnerable person out on the streets all day, all year. The Trussell Trust support more than 1,200 food bank centres in the UK to provide a minimum of three days’ nutritionally-balanced emergency food to people who have been referred in crisis, as well as support to help people resolve the crises they face. Between April 2018 and March 2019, food banks in their network, provided a record 1.6 million food supplies to people experiencing the current homelessness crisis, a 19% increase on the previous year!

As part of the project, we were set the task of organising a social action, this means we had to be pro-active in raising awareness for our social issue in our community. So far, we have created ‘care packages’ including some essential items that a homeless person living rough may require, including toilet paper, tinned goods, hygiene products such as feminine products and wipes and much more. Now, we’ve understood how something so simple, such as these necessities, can be much more valuable and long-lasting for homeless person. Not only that, but they can also help people in crisis maintain dignity and feel human again. These care packages are now going to Trafford’s Trussell Trust Food Bank, in appreciation of the work they do for our community.

As well as making these packages, to raise awareness about our social issue, homelessness, we decided to write a blog post that would feature on the school’s Humanities blog to, hopefully, educate our fellow students on why we believe homelessness is a crisis to be dealt with today, not tomorrow…

We hope this inspires you to be more pro-active in your community and educated you more about such a significant issue, that is happening right now. If you would like to join us in demolishing homelessness for good, then you can drop off your food parcel or a non-food items to the RS department. For more information on what they are specifically looking for, you can visit their website – https://www.trusselltrust.org/

Thank you for taking your time to read this,

From students in Year 9

SGS MUN

Students at AGGS participated in the Stockport MUN competition last weekend. The team represented India and explored topics on the environment, disarmament and other general political issues. Our team were all relatively new delegates however all rose to the challenge and spoke clearly and confidently about many different issues. We had two of our more experienced MUN members chairing committees, one of whom chaired the Security Council, an amazing honor:-)

Sunday saw India take to the stage in the General Assembly with the delegation speaking and their resolution being passed. A number of students achieved awards, as our picture shows. Well done to all involved, Mr Humphry’s and Miss Mitchell are super proud of you 🙂

Women and War

To celebrate Women’s History Month, AGGS hosted a ‘Women and War’ fortnight of exciting activities and inspiring us all with the fascinating stories of some of history’s most remarkable women.

As part of the fortnight, a variety of women and their amazing stories were told in the form of documentaries. Starting the week off, Stacey Dooley’s documentary, ‘Stacey on the Frontline: Girls, Guns and Isis’, explored the stories of Yazidi women and how they were trained to fight against Isis in 2016. The Yazidi population in northern Syria were targeted by ISIS and survivors grouped together and trained to fight alongside male fighters against ISIS at the front line.

Islamic Society watched the film ‘The Breadwinner’ which follows the life of Parvana, an 11-year-old girl who lives under Taliban rule in Afghanistan. Parvana decides to dress like a boy in order to support her family and the film follows Parvana in her fight to reunite her family.  This is a brilliant film of a young girl’s courage during a period of Taliban rule and the violence young girls and women faced. 

A careers talk on Monday was given by Major Jill Winters about her career serving in the army within the army medical team and her deployments in Afghanistan and Iraq. As a former student, her career path is fascinating and admirable and the talk was a great opportunity for those wishing to pursue a career in medicine or the armed forces.

As well as this, Mrs Lovelady held a workshop emphasising the role of women in manufacturing roles. Here are some photos of the brilliant work the Year 7 and 8s have done:

Finally, on Thursday, several members of staff were dressed up for the Women and War theme for an exciting activity for Year 7. At lunchtime, Year 7s had to walk around and find out each character’s fascinating fact and complete a form. We had our very own Queen Elizabeth I (Mrs Hulme), Boudicca (Mrs Cooke), Frida Khalo (Mrs Wells) and many other characters walking around AGGS. Here’s a few of the members of staff with their facts:

Mrs Cooke- Boudicca 

When her husband died, Rome tried to take her money and land, saying women could not inherit men’s property. This didn’t go down well with this war paint covered Celtish warrior.

Q: Approximately what year did Boudicca fight against Rome to reclaim her rights at the battle of Watling Street?

A: 60AD

 

Mrs Stokes- Auxiliary Territorial Services Member 

ATS members wore red crosses to show they were involved in medical services such as ambulance driving and allowed them to participate as part of a voluntary service. 

Q: What was unusual (by today’s standards) about most ATS ambulance drivers?

A: They had never driven a car before they drove an ambulance- few women drove cars at all.

 

Mrs Hughes- Modern Soldier 

Fighting today all across the globe, modern day soldiers have equipment and clothing made of specialist equipment, things previous generations could have never imagined. 

Q: In which year were women allowed to fight as part of the same battalion as men?

A: 1992- before that, women were part of the Women’s Royal Army Corps.

 

Mrs Willmott- Women’s Land Army

These women took to the fields and farms to take over the roles previously done by men and feeding the nation. A muddy job…

Q: How much were WLA paid?

A: 28 shillings per week – 10 shillings less than med doing the same job!

Women’s History Month aims to celebrate the work and strength of admirable women and their contributions to society. We hope the fortnight of activities were enjoyable and the stories told will inspire you and your future.

And here are some more questions for you to find the answers to!

Q: At what age did Joan lead the French troops against the British Army?

Q: Which Emperor of Rome did Cleopatra fight against to secure her throne?

Q: Between 1914-1919, how many British nurses served overseas?

 

ALTYMUN 2019

On MUNday 4th March 2019, 6 months of hard work, planning and preparation came together in the AltyMUN 2019 conference hosted at our school. In the months upcoming to this fateful day, the Model UN team here at AGGS slaved away liaising with the participating schools; planning and filming a crisis video; writing up briefing papers for the debate and much more. It was possibly one of the most nerve-wracking days in my life, as I had the most major part in the whole organisation of the process as Secretary-General of the conference.

After school, all the chairs and delegates gathered together in the Main Hall as we waited in bated breath for all attending schools to arrive after making the final preparations. 4 schools attended (Altrincham Grammar School for Boys; Loreto Grammar School; Loreto College and St Ambrose College), each bringing 7-10 delegates. There were students from AGGS also selling snacks that were necessary for the delegates to bribe us chairs! After a short opening ceremony, the chairs took their delegates to their respective committees: Political, Disarmament and Security (DISEC), Economic and Social (EcoSoc); Environment and Human Rights.

Political:

Our committee was intense from the very beginning. We only got around 10 minutes into debate and I could have sworn there had been around 20 Points of Order, with delegates blatantly flouting parliamentary procedure, much to the disappointment of us chairs. However, we were pleased once fed with bribes of cookies from Venezuela! Venezuela also blessed the committee with comedic sound effects when needed. After forcing the delegate France to do a rendition of Dancing Queen by ABBA, we continued our debate on Western Intervention, passing a resolution with the acronym CHINESETAIPEI. In the end we awarded Commended Delegate to Venezuela; Highly Commended to USA and Outstanding to China. The standard of debate was incredibly high and the two of us are extremely pleased to say everyone in the committee spoke at least once!

Safa (Year 12)

Human Rights:

Our committee began with the breaking of bread from France- literally, as he brought in a whole baguette and shared it between chairs and delegates respectively. We debated our first clause while simultaneously voting for who we thought were best for the joke awards- which later led to some discontent from dr Congo, who was unfortunately voted the ‘do nothing candidate’. After numerous points of order from Venezuela and the dream team of UK and Saudi Arabia powering through every single interruption, the session came to an end with USA winning the Outstanding Award; Venezuela winning Highly Commended and Australia winning Commended. It was highly enjoyable for all as by the end, all delegates got involved and had something to say.

Sanaa (Year 12)

Environment:

We started the debate with an ice breaker (even though we were told not to) right from the start it was obvious that the debate was going to be comedic and full of personality. The ice breaker truly allowed for us to get to know each other and for us to get more comfortable with each other. Soon after, many bribes were handed to the chairs from almost every delegate. Then, the debating began, right from the start dozens of points of order were called and all speakers spoke with passion and character. After some more humorous comments from the USA in regards to climate change, we continued to the voting procedure, although our resolution did not pass, there were many amendments that were added. In the end, we awarded Commended delegate to USA; Highly Commended to Saudi Arabia and Outstanding to Dr Congo. Debating was that of an extremely high standard and every single delegate contributed to the debate!

Gowri (Year 9)

Economic and Social:

In the Ecosoc committee, we received clauses from several delegates, where we were debating ‘the issue of economic sanctions on vulnerable populations.’ One of which from China who almost every time he spoke, had to be asked to make their closing remarks. Many delegates spoke very well when taking the floor, responding and giving points of information – some of which from other delegates still had to be asked to come to their closing remarks! The delegate from France had brought in a cake with a familiar face on the front, as it was their birthday, and we were shocked to find he didn’t want to bribe the chairs with it. In the end we awarded Commended delegate to China, Highly Commended Delegate to Russia and Outstanding Delegate to Venezuela. The debate become quite heated between the delegates and even though not everyone spoke, everyone was very engaged!

Emily (Year 11)

Disarmament and Security:

DISEC committee was debating the weaponisation of big data (the analysis of statistics of the public) and saw such recommendations as requesting individual governments to use big data analytics to predict and prevent future terrorist attacks in their own countries from Russia and calling for China to withdraw it’s social credit system (a system already in place in areas in China which gives citizens a credit number according to big data analytics of all their public and private data) from UK. It was argued on many fronts that big data analytics, and the Social Credit System in particular, violate the basic human right to privacy. Others insisted that safety and order should come first. Despite all this fruitful debate, the only amendment actually passed was Venezuela’s command that all countries implement China’s Social Credit System as soon as possible because, like a post apocalyptic, teenage dystopian, it would be “cool”. By the end, the awards given in DISEC were: Commended to Venezuela and China; Highly Commended to France and Outstanding to UK.

Lucy (Year 10)

When committees ended, all delegates and chairs reconvened in the Main Hall to debate the crisis in General Assembly, which proved to be a chaotic affair as the projectors weren’t working for a good 10 minutes, which we regarded as the real crisis. However, Mr Copestake came to the rescue (we’d like to award him the joke award of delegate’s delegate) and we managed to get some debate going. We debated a range of clauses submitted from member states, including the acronym ONEPEOPLEONECHINA. We gave Australia Commended Delegation; Highly Commended Delegation to Venezuela and Outstanding Delegation to China, with each Chinese delegate receiving a special AltyMUN 2019 keyring.

As Secretary-General, I brought AltyMUN 2019 to a close with a closing speech, where I reflected on my first MUN conference 3 years ago and encouraged all delegates to have the confidence to speak out in MUN. I thanked all delegates for coming and the AGGS MUN team for making the conference happen. We thanked our advisors Miss Mitchell and Mr Humphrys for their invaluable help in the conference and gifted them with flowers. AltyMUN 2019 ended when I hit the gong and it fell over in an iconic moment that led to a standing ovation from the floor. Then, Bella and Beth in Year 13 spoke and I was delighted, surprised and incredibly emotional to be gifted flowers and a card from the MUN team for organising the conference. Everyone at AGGS worked incredibly hard to make the conference happen and I am happy to say that it was a huge success.

“I now declare AltyMUN 2019 closed!”

Safa Al-Azami Year 12

ALTYMUN Success

Last night saw AGGS host ALTYMUN 2019, this was the first time we have hosted a conference in 6 years. We had 5 schools with over 60 young people in total and our students were amazing. Safa in year 12 organised the whole conference with the help of lots of willing volunteers. The students were a credit to us all. The level of debate was fantastic and the feedback from other schools was really positive. Thank you to those who helped to make this day a success.

See the students interesting report here

Year 8 Trip to the Synagogue

The trip to the Synagogue was an amazing experience! It was very interesting because it linked perfectly to what Year 8 have been studying in their RS lessons. We got the opportunity to ask the experts lots of questions, which was definitely not wasted! We were shown around and taught about the main features of a Synagogue and what happen when Jewish People worship. I learnt a lot from this trip. For example, we were told that Jewish People have a prayer for the Royal family, which originated as a way of thanking the Royal Family for allowing the Jewish Population back into England after their previous expulsion. Also, the fact that we got to see the Torah, Jewish people’s holy scripture was very exciting!! To be honest, I expected the Synagogue to be architecturally similar to a church; old and traditional. But to my surprise, the Synagogue was very modern. Overall, this was an awesome trip and was very valuable in helping with my understanding in this particular topic about Judaism.

Written by Fatima, Year 8

Year 11 General Citizenship challenge: ’The Body Myth’

Students were asked to create a campaign message in line with the aims of the ‘Dove self-esteem project’ to help to build body confidence in our school community: staff and students as well as parents and friends of our school. Here is a sample of the messages they created that they wanted to share with you.

Miss Mitchel, Head of Citizenship and Mrs Charlton, Teacher of Citizenship