RS Quiz No 6

  1. Can you name the Muslim female World War 2 veteran who was awarded a George Cross for bravery?
  2. What was the name of the first mosque in Britain and who founded it?
  3. Where does the musical instrument the lute come from?
  4. When the  Prophet Muhammad received his first revelation as a Prophet, who was the first to believe in him and support him?
  5. 2 women in particular are mentioned as eternal role models in Chapter 66 of the Quran. Can you name them?
  6. Who built the first pinhole camera around 1000 AD?
  7. What does Allahu Akbar mean?
  8. What chapter in the Quran is named after a much revered lady?
  9. What contribution did early Muslims make to modern surgery?
  10. Do you know what the words ‘Islam’ and ‘Muslim’ mean?

Click here to see the answers

Geography Club Wins Second Prize!

Our team of Year 7 Geography Club members (Su M, Anna RT, Lucy L, Sophia K and Avni D) have won second prize in the United Utilities Vlogstars competition! They have been awarded with £50 Amazon vouchers and framed certificates. School are also in receipt of a £250 cheque.

Well done to them and thanks for all of your votes!

SGS MUN

Students at AGGS participated in the Stockport MUN competition last weekend. The team represented India and explored topics on the environment, disarmament and other general political issues. Our team were all relatively new delegates however all rose to the challenge and spoke clearly and confidently about many different issues. We had two of our more experienced MUN members chairing committees, one of whom chaired the Security Council, an amazing honor:-)

Sunday saw India take to the stage in the General Assembly with the delegation speaking and their resolution being passed. A number of students achieved awards, as our picture shows. Well done to all involved, Mr Humphry’s and Miss Mitchell are super proud of you 🙂

Year 10 trip to the Town Hall

Year 10 GCSE Citizenship group were hosted by the Local Mayor Tom Ross last Friday at Trafford Town Hall. Students went on a tour of the building and learnt about the role of the local council and the local mayor. The morning culminated in a Q & A in the council chambers. Thank you to Trafford Town hall for bringing local politics to life for the students.

Women and War

To celebrate Women’s History Month, AGGS hosted a ‘Women and War’ fortnight of exciting activities and inspiring us all with the fascinating stories of some of history’s most remarkable women.

As part of the fortnight, a variety of women and their amazing stories were told in the form of documentaries. Starting the week off, Stacey Dooley’s documentary, ‘Stacey on the Frontline: Girls, Guns and Isis’, explored the stories of Yazidi women and how they were trained to fight against Isis in 2016. The Yazidi population in northern Syria were targeted by ISIS and survivors grouped together and trained to fight alongside male fighters against ISIS at the front line.

Islamic Society watched the film ‘The Breadwinner’ which follows the life of Parvana, an 11-year-old girl who lives under Taliban rule in Afghanistan. Parvana decides to dress like a boy in order to support her family and the film follows Parvana in her fight to reunite her family.  This is a brilliant film of a young girl’s courage during a period of Taliban rule and the violence young girls and women faced. 

A careers talk on Monday was given by Major Jill Winters about her career serving in the army within the army medical team and her deployments in Afghanistan and Iraq. As a former student, her career path is fascinating and admirable and the talk was a great opportunity for those wishing to pursue a career in medicine or the armed forces.

As well as this, Mrs Lovelady held a workshop emphasising the role of women in manufacturing roles. Here are some photos of the brilliant work the Year 7 and 8s have done:

Finally, on Thursday, several members of staff were dressed up for the Women and War theme for an exciting activity for Year 7. At lunchtime, Year 7s had to walk around and find out each character’s fascinating fact and complete a form. We had our very own Queen Elizabeth I (Mrs Hulme), Boudicca (Mrs Cooke), Frida Khalo (Mrs Wells) and many other characters walking around AGGS. Here’s a few of the members of staff with their facts:

Mrs Cooke- Boudicca 

When her husband died, Rome tried to take her money and land, saying women could not inherit men’s property. This didn’t go down well with this war paint covered Celtish warrior.

Q: Approximately what year did Boudicca fight against Rome to reclaim her rights at the battle of Watling Street?

A: 60AD

 

Mrs Stokes- Auxiliary Territorial Services Member 

ATS members wore red crosses to show they were involved in medical services such as ambulance driving and allowed them to participate as part of a voluntary service. 

Q: What was unusual (by today’s standards) about most ATS ambulance drivers?

A: They had never driven a car before they drove an ambulance- few women drove cars at all.

 

Mrs Hughes- Modern Soldier 

Fighting today all across the globe, modern day soldiers have equipment and clothing made of specialist equipment, things previous generations could have never imagined. 

Q: In which year were women allowed to fight as part of the same battalion as men?

A: 1992- before that, women were part of the Women’s Royal Army Corps.

 

Mrs Willmott- Women’s Land Army

These women took to the fields and farms to take over the roles previously done by men and feeding the nation. A muddy job…

Q: How much were WLA paid?

A: 28 shillings per week – 10 shillings less than med doing the same job!

Women’s History Month aims to celebrate the work and strength of admirable women and their contributions to society. We hope the fortnight of activities were enjoyable and the stories told will inspire you and your future.

And here are some more questions for you to find the answers to!

Q: At what age did Joan lead the French troops against the British Army?

Q: Which Emperor of Rome did Cleopatra fight against to secure her throne?

Q: Between 1914-1919, how many British nurses served overseas?

 

ALTYMUN 2019

On MUNday 4th March 2019, 6 months of hard work, planning and preparation came together in the AltyMUN 2019 conference hosted at our school. In the months upcoming to this fateful day, the Model UN team here at AGGS slaved away liaising with the participating schools; planning and filming a crisis video; writing up briefing papers for the debate and much more. It was possibly one of the most nerve-wracking days in my life, as I had the most major part in the whole organisation of the process as Secretary-General of the conference.

After school, all the chairs and delegates gathered together in the Main Hall as we waited in bated breath for all attending schools to arrive after making the final preparations. 4 schools attended (Altrincham Grammar School for Boys; Loreto Grammar School; Loreto College and St Ambrose College), each bringing 7-10 delegates. There were students from AGGS also selling snacks that were necessary for the delegates to bribe us chairs! After a short opening ceremony, the chairs took their delegates to their respective committees: Political, Disarmament and Security (DISEC), Economic and Social (EcoSoc); Environment and Human Rights.

Political:

Our committee was intense from the very beginning. We only got around 10 minutes into debate and I could have sworn there had been around 20 Points of Order, with delegates blatantly flouting parliamentary procedure, much to the disappointment of us chairs. However, we were pleased once fed with bribes of cookies from Venezuela! Venezuela also blessed the committee with comedic sound effects when needed. After forcing the delegate France to do a rendition of Dancing Queen by ABBA, we continued our debate on Western Intervention, passing a resolution with the acronym CHINESETAIPEI. In the end we awarded Commended Delegate to Venezuela; Highly Commended to USA and Outstanding to China. The standard of debate was incredibly high and the two of us are extremely pleased to say everyone in the committee spoke at least once!

Safa (Year 12)

Human Rights:

Our committee began with the breaking of bread from France- literally, as he brought in a whole baguette and shared it between chairs and delegates respectively. We debated our first clause while simultaneously voting for who we thought were best for the joke awards- which later led to some discontent from dr Congo, who was unfortunately voted the ‘do nothing candidate’. After numerous points of order from Venezuela and the dream team of UK and Saudi Arabia powering through every single interruption, the session came to an end with USA winning the Outstanding Award; Venezuela winning Highly Commended and Australia winning Commended. It was highly enjoyable for all as by the end, all delegates got involved and had something to say.

Sanaa (Year 12)

Environment:

We started the debate with an ice breaker (even though we were told not to) right from the start it was obvious that the debate was going to be comedic and full of personality. The ice breaker truly allowed for us to get to know each other and for us to get more comfortable with each other. Soon after, many bribes were handed to the chairs from almost every delegate. Then, the debating began, right from the start dozens of points of order were called and all speakers spoke with passion and character. After some more humorous comments from the USA in regards to climate change, we continued to the voting procedure, although our resolution did not pass, there were many amendments that were added. In the end, we awarded Commended delegate to USA; Highly Commended to Saudi Arabia and Outstanding to Dr Congo. Debating was that of an extremely high standard and every single delegate contributed to the debate!

Gowri (Year 9)

Economic and Social:

In the Ecosoc committee, we received clauses from several delegates, where we were debating ‘the issue of economic sanctions on vulnerable populations.’ One of which from China who almost every time he spoke, had to be asked to make their closing remarks. Many delegates spoke very well when taking the floor, responding and giving points of information – some of which from other delegates still had to be asked to come to their closing remarks! The delegate from France had brought in a cake with a familiar face on the front, as it was their birthday, and we were shocked to find he didn’t want to bribe the chairs with it. In the end we awarded Commended delegate to China, Highly Commended Delegate to Russia and Outstanding Delegate to Venezuela. The debate become quite heated between the delegates and even though not everyone spoke, everyone was very engaged!

Emily (Year 11)

Disarmament and Security:

DISEC committee was debating the weaponisation of big data (the analysis of statistics of the public) and saw such recommendations as requesting individual governments to use big data analytics to predict and prevent future terrorist attacks in their own countries from Russia and calling for China to withdraw it’s social credit system (a system already in place in areas in China which gives citizens a credit number according to big data analytics of all their public and private data) from UK. It was argued on many fronts that big data analytics, and the Social Credit System in particular, violate the basic human right to privacy. Others insisted that safety and order should come first. Despite all this fruitful debate, the only amendment actually passed was Venezuela’s command that all countries implement China’s Social Credit System as soon as possible because, like a post apocalyptic, teenage dystopian, it would be “cool”. By the end, the awards given in DISEC were: Commended to Venezuela and China; Highly Commended to France and Outstanding to UK.

Lucy (Year 10)

When committees ended, all delegates and chairs reconvened in the Main Hall to debate the crisis in General Assembly, which proved to be a chaotic affair as the projectors weren’t working for a good 10 minutes, which we regarded as the real crisis. However, Mr Copestake came to the rescue (we’d like to award him the joke award of delegate’s delegate) and we managed to get some debate going. We debated a range of clauses submitted from member states, including the acronym ONEPEOPLEONECHINA. We gave Australia Commended Delegation; Highly Commended Delegation to Venezuela and Outstanding Delegation to China, with each Chinese delegate receiving a special AltyMUN 2019 keyring.

As Secretary-General, I brought AltyMUN 2019 to a close with a closing speech, where I reflected on my first MUN conference 3 years ago and encouraged all delegates to have the confidence to speak out in MUN. I thanked all delegates for coming and the AGGS MUN team for making the conference happen. We thanked our advisors Miss Mitchell and Mr Humphrys for their invaluable help in the conference and gifted them with flowers. AltyMUN 2019 ended when I hit the gong and it fell over in an iconic moment that led to a standing ovation from the floor. Then, Bella and Beth in Year 13 spoke and I was delighted, surprised and incredibly emotional to be gifted flowers and a card from the MUN team for organising the conference. Everyone at AGGS worked incredibly hard to make the conference happen and I am happy to say that it was a huge success.

“I now declare AltyMUN 2019 closed!”

Safa Al-Azami Year 12

AGGS’ SALSA team shortlisted in a vlogging competition

A group of Year 7 Geography Club members called SALSA team (Su M, Anna R T, Lucy L, Sophia K and Avni D) have been shortlisted in a vlogging competition set up by United Utilities. They have produced a really interesting video publicising the dangers of flushing wet wipes (and other objects) down the toilet.

Vote for Team Salsa entry! Whichever video has received the most votes by Sunday 24th March will be the United Utilities Vlogstars 2019!

Voting for the video is easy – just click on this link and select their video to vote for them: www.unitedutilities.com/votenow

Thanks and remember: vote early, vote often!

Digital Surgery 2019

To get a better understanding of Parliament and politics in general, the Y10 Citizenship classes were lucky enough to video call a member of the House of Lords, Baroness Lister, about important political topics, such as Brexit and women in politics.

Before our discussion, we spent a few lessons researching about Baroness Lister and came up with a series of questions that we could ask her. For example, as she was a member of the Labour party, there were lots of questions about her stance on Brexit and her view on the resignation of Labour MPs who chose to join the Independent Group. It was a little intimidating at first, as I was worried that Baroness Lister would use a lot of political jargon and confuse all of us, but she was very friendly and happy to talk about issues that mattered to us, such as mental health. We also had a discussion about whether the voting age should be lowered to 16, and it was interesting to hear about what Parliament was doing about Citizenship in schools. Hearing about her political views and her experience as a Lord meant that we all learnt something new during our discussion. For example, something which I was surprised to learn was that members of the House of Lords are unable to vote!

This video call was set up by the Politics Project, which is a project that aims to get people involved in politics and improve their understanding of it. I think that this is a great idea, as I felt that by talking to people who were passionate and involved in politics (such as Baroness Lister), it made me more comfortable about talking to people in politics.

Overall, it was reassuring to know that a lot of issues that I believed in were also things that mattered to her. It was also really interesting to hear about Baroness Lister’s view on politics and how her view might be different from mine.

Written by Wei-Ning T

ALTYMUN Success

Last night saw AGGS host ALTYMUN 2019, this was the first time we have hosted a conference in 6 years. We had 5 schools with over 60 young people in total and our students were amazing. Safa in year 12 organised the whole conference with the help of lots of willing volunteers. The students were a credit to us all. The level of debate was fantastic and the feedback from other schools was really positive. Thank you to those who helped to make this day a success.

See the students interesting report here