Eleanor’s Petition Gets Heard

Eleanor H of Year 8 created a petition to get a crossing by St Margaret’s Church on the A56. Eleanor gained over 500 signatures and as a result the local council have listened to her present and then debated this issue on Wednesday 20th March 2019.

Eleanor has the backing of the local green party and is a young green member. The local Green Party launch for the May local elections saw the leader of the Green party, Jonathan Bartley, throw his support behind Eleanor’s campaign. She passionately spoke about it and he was very impressed with her campaigning skills, Eleanor is clearly a politician in the making, her achievements are amazing.

See Eleanor presenting her campaign at Trafford Town Hall on Wednesday 20th March – Minute 11:

https://trafford.public-i.tv/core/portal/webcast_interactive/413316

Also – see an article about it on Atrincham Today:
http://altrincham.today/2019/03/18/news/green-party-leader-backs-altrincham-teenagers-campaign-improve-dangerous-a56-crossing/

Women and War

To celebrate Women’s History Month, AGGS hosted a ‘Women and War’ fortnight of exciting activities and inspiring us all with the fascinating stories of some of history’s most remarkable women.

As part of the fortnight, a variety of women and their amazing stories were told in the form of documentaries. Starting the week off, Stacey Dooley’s documentary, ‘Stacey on the Frontline: Girls, Guns and Isis’, explored the stories of Yazidi women and how they were trained to fight against Isis in 2016. The Yazidi population in northern Syria were targeted by ISIS and survivors grouped together and trained to fight alongside male fighters against ISIS at the front line.

Islamic Society watched the film ‘The Breadwinner’ which follows the life of Parvana, an 11-year-old girl who lives under Taliban rule in Afghanistan. Parvana decides to dress like a boy in order to support her family and the film follows Parvana in her fight to reunite her family.  This is a brilliant film of a young girl’s courage during a period of Taliban rule and the violence young girls and women faced. 

A careers talk on Monday was given by Major Jill Winters about her career serving in the army within the army medical team and her deployments in Afghanistan and Iraq. As a former student, her career path is fascinating and admirable and the talk was a great opportunity for those wishing to pursue a career in medicine or the armed forces.

As well as this, Mrs Lovelady held a workshop emphasising the role of women in manufacturing roles. Here are some photos of the brilliant work the Year 7 and 8s have done:

Finally, on Thursday, several members of staff were dressed up for the Women and War theme for an exciting activity for Year 7. At lunchtime, Year 7s had to walk around and find out each character’s fascinating fact and complete a form. We had our very own Queen Elizabeth I (Mrs Hulme), Boudicca (Mrs Cooke), Frida Khalo (Mrs Wells) and many other characters walking around AGGS. Here’s a few of the members of staff with their facts:

Mrs Cooke- Boudicca 

When her husband died, Rome tried to take her money and land, saying women could not inherit men’s property. This didn’t go down well with this war paint covered Celtish warrior.

Q: Approximately what year did Boudicca fight against Rome to reclaim her rights at the battle of Watling Street?

A: 60AD

 

Mrs Stokes- Auxiliary Territorial Services Member 

ATS members wore red crosses to show they were involved in medical services such as ambulance driving and allowed them to participate as part of a voluntary service. 

Q: What was unusual (by today’s standards) about most ATS ambulance drivers?

A: They had never driven a car before they drove an ambulance- few women drove cars at all.

 

Mrs Hughes- Modern Soldier 

Fighting today all across the globe, modern day soldiers have equipment and clothing made of specialist equipment, things previous generations could have never imagined. 

Q: In which year were women allowed to fight as part of the same battalion as men?

A: 1992- before that, women were part of the Women’s Royal Army Corps.

 

Mrs Willmott- Women’s Land Army

These women took to the fields and farms to take over the roles previously done by men and feeding the nation. A muddy job…

Q: How much were WLA paid?

A: 28 shillings per week – 10 shillings less than med doing the same job!

Women’s History Month aims to celebrate the work and strength of admirable women and their contributions to society. We hope the fortnight of activities were enjoyable and the stories told will inspire you and your future.

And here are some more questions for you to find the answers to!

Q: At what age did Joan lead the French troops against the British Army?

Q: Which Emperor of Rome did Cleopatra fight against to secure her throne?

Q: Between 1914-1919, how many British nurses served overseas?